Millwall Forum - Sky think we were founded by jam and marmalade makers, rather tinsmiths-altho Mortons did make some!
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Sky think we were founded by jam and marmalade makers, rather tinsmiths-altho Mortons did make some!
22 October 2017 12:32 Post ID: #1558307 - in reply to #1558244
MOnster
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What do census stats suggest for the sex of the job of 'jam maker' as it's still dealing with industrial product, not exactly a lazy afternoon in the kitchen with a couple of jars and a saucepan, but tens of litres in a vat.
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22 October 2017 12:40 Post ID: #1558308 - in reply to #1558244
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I'd imagine the average working-class Victorian woman would beat most 21st century men in an arm wrestle.
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22 October 2017 13:02 Post ID: #1558310 - in reply to #1558252
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45skiprats - 22/10/2017 00:51

I suppose the golly wog was down to us as well


I hope so.




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22 October 2017 14:53 Post ID: #1558325 - in reply to #1558270
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Moody - 22/10/2017 09:27

lionheart488 - 22/10/2017 09:11

My two granddads worked in Jam factories, one on the isle of dogs and the other at Ratcliffe Cross close to Free Trade Wharf in the Highway.
The one that worked on the Isle of Dogs also shovelled coal from the barges so I do not know if they intermixed in seasons of work.


I think this is where the story gets mixed up.

Surely they worked in factories where where jam was a product put into cans / pots to be shipped off. In that they were not out picking strawberries in the sun drenched fields of the East End and then turning them into jam.

Anyways, the men that decided to set up Millwall Rovers were said to be tin-smiths who worked at Morton's. Not jam and marmalade 'makers'.


Mood, No the fruit would have been transported from Cambridgeshire (Strawberries) and Kent (Gooseberries, blackberries and such) Christ knows how often Oranges were available to make Marmalade.
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22 October 2017 14:53 Post ID: #1558326 - in reply to #1558270
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Moody - 22/10/2017 09:27

lionheart488 - 22/10/2017 09:11

My two granddads worked in Jam factories, one on the isle of dogs and the other at Ratcliffe Cross close to Free Trade Wharf in the Highway.
The one that worked on the Isle of Dogs also shovelled coal from the barges so I do not know if they intermixed in seasons of work.


I think this is where the story gets mixed up.

Surely they worked in factories where where jam was a product put into cans / pots to be shipped off. In that they were not out picking strawberries in the sun drenched fields of the East End and then turning them into jam.

Anyways, the men that decided to set up Millwall Rovers were said to be tin-smiths who worked at Morton's. Not jam and marmalade 'makers'.


Mood, No the fruit would have been transported from Cambridgeshire (Strawberries) and Kent (Gooseberries, blackberries and such) Christ knows how often Oranges were available to make Marmalade.
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22 October 2017 15:00 Post ID: #1558329 - in reply to #1558326
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lionheart48 - 22/10/2017 14:53

Moody - 22/10/2017 09:27

lionheart488 - 22/10/2017 09:11

My two granddads worked in Jam factories, one on the isle of dogs and the other at Ratcliffe Cross close to Free Trade Wharf in the Highway.
The one that worked on the Isle of Dogs also shovelled coal from the barges so I do not know if they intermixed in seasons of work.


I think this is where the story gets mixed up.

Surely they worked in factories where where jam was a product put into cans / pots to be shipped off. In that they were not out picking strawberries in the sun drenched fields of the East End and then turning them into jam.

Anyways, the men that decided to set up Millwall Rovers were said to be tin-smiths who worked at Morton's. Not jam and marmalade 'makers'.


Mood, No the fruit would have been transported from Cambridgeshire (Strawberries) and Kent (Gooseberries, blackberries and such) Christ knows how often Oranges were available to make Marmalade.


Did your grandads actually make the jam do you know? As that's some great social history right there! Must have been fascinating to see!
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22 October 2017 15:32 Post ID: #1558339 - in reply to #1558244
MOnster
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Why fascinating? It's jam for fucks sake!

Oh so you add that amount of sugar to some hot strawberry juice and water your drained off? then re-add it to some juicy chunks of piece of fruit, how fascinating!

Get me video of the first time Millwall went toe to toe with west ham in 1903? now that would be fascinating.
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22 October 2017 15:36 Post ID: #1558340 - in reply to #1558244
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Ha. Because I'd love to see a Victorian factory in the heart of the East End turning out jam and watching it get loaded on to ships to go around the Empire. More from a social history point of view, rather to see jam made.

And yes, I would also love to see Wall v Thames Ironworks too and see our Dockers batter them.
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22 October 2017 15:43 Post ID: #1558342 - in reply to #1558244
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John Thomas Morton went into business as a provision merchant in Aberdeen in 1849, subsequently building up a large trade in the export of canned and other preserved foods.

The Millwall factory was opened about 1872 at the former oil works of Price &; Company; later expansion included the opening of a herring cannery at Lowestoft and a depot in Cubitt Town. After Morton's death in 1897, the business was run by his sons. C. &; E. Morton Ltd, as the firm became, was for many years among the largest local employers.

Millwall Football Club originated with a team formed by workers at Mortons in 1885.

The company's main trade was overseas. It supplied food to the Polar expeditions led by Shackleton and Scott, and was one of the principal suppliers of canned food to the armed forces during the First World War.

After the war Mortons lost ground to foreign and colonial competitors and had to turn to the home market.

Best known for jam, the factory also produced a variety of processed foods and confections, including jelly, caramel, chocolate, custard, marsh mallow, liquorice and fondants, as well as Seidlitz powder, magnesia and Epsom salts.

In 1945 the company was taken over by the Beecham Group and the Mortons business was concentrated at Lowestoft, producing canned vegetables and fruit fillings. The Millwall works were gradually run down. Waterways Ltd, wharfingers, an associated company of Mortons, occupied the riverside buildings for some years after the Second World War.

A food and soft drinks distribution depot, with a north-light concreteshell roof, built in the 1950s on the corner of Westferry Road and Cuba Street, remained in use into the 1980s, but by that tFime most of the riverside part of the works had been derelict for some years.

The former Dockside Preserving Factory on the east side of Westferry Road (which remains in industrial use) had been sold. The northern part of the site is now occupied by the Cascades development and the site of the depot by The Anchorage.
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22 October 2017 15:47 Post ID: #1558343 - in reply to #1558244
MOnster
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I know what you mean, kinda, watched an episode once on how they made the old tins back in early 1900s, it was quite interesting.
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22 October 2017 15:50 Post ID: #1558344 - in reply to #1558329
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Moody - 22/10/2017 15:00

lionheart48 - 22/10/2017 14:53

Moody - 22/10/2017 09:27

lionheart488 - 22/10/2017 09:11

My two granddads worked in Jam factories, one on the isle of dogs and the other at Ratcliffe Cross close to Free Trade Wharf in the Highway.
The one that worked on the Isle of Dogs also shovelled coal from the barges so I do not know if they intermixed in seasons of work.


I think this is where the story gets mixed up.

Surely they worked in factories where where jam was a product put into cans / pots to be shipped off. In that they were not out picking strawberries in the sun drenched fields of the East End and then turning them into jam.

Anyways, the men that decided to set up Millwall Rovers were said to be tin-smiths who worked at Morton's. Not jam and marmalade 'makers'.


Mood, No the fruit would have been transported from Cambridgeshire (Strawberries) and Kent (Gooseberries, blackberries and such) Christ knows how often Oranges were available to make Marmalade.


Did your grandads actually make the jam do you know? As that's some great social history right there! Must have been fascinating to see!


I have no idea about the one that worked on the Isle of Dogs, he was dead when I came along, my old man was third youngest of 12 and hated his old man, he was a drunken wife beater but loved the Lions.
My old man was encouraged to support them because his brother supported them, but luckily this was the only trait he inherited (He was a loving family man).
The other grandfather definitely made Jam at Ratcliffe Cross but he had a load of jobs but primarily he was a volunteer for the cavalry, but my mothers household was never short of jam apparently and he finished up as a boiler stoker working at Barnardos in Stepney Causeway (The original home with the baby font at the entrance).
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22 October 2017 15:59 Post ID: #1558345 - in reply to #1558244
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Some of the Mortons girls striking in 1914...



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22 October 2017 16:59 Post ID: #1558352 - in reply to #1558244
MOnster
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Is it wrong to fancy your fellow fan's grandmother?
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22 October 2017 20:36 Post ID: #1558370 - in reply to #1558244
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The one to the right of the lady elevated above others looks very familiar.
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22 October 2017 23:46 Post ID: #1558380 - in reply to #1558342
MOjo
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Moody - 22/10/2017 15:43

John Thomas Morton went into business as a provision merchant in Aberdeen in 1849, subsequently building up a large trade in the export of canned and other preserved foods.

The Millwall factory was opened about 1872 at the former oil works of Price &; Company; later expansion included the opening of a herring cannery at Lowestoft and a depot in Cubitt Town. After Morton's death in 1897, the business was run by his sons. C. &; E. Morton Ltd, as the firm became, was for many years among the largest local employers.

Millwall Football Club originated with a team formed by workers at Mortons in 1885.

The company's main trade was overseas. It supplied food to the Polar expeditions led by Shackleton and Scott, and was one of the principal suppliers of canned food to the armed forces during the First World War.

After the war Mortons lost ground to foreign and colonial competitors and had to turn to the home market.

Best known for jam, the factory also produced a variety of processed foods and confections, including jelly, caramel, chocolate, custard, marsh mallow, liquorice and fondants, as well as Seidlitz powder, magnesia and Epsom salts.

In 1945 the company was taken over by the Beecham Group and the Mortons business was concentrated at Lowestoft, producing canned vegetables and fruit fillings. The Millwall works were gradually run down. Waterways Ltd, wharfingers, an associated company of Mortons, occupied the riverside buildings for some years after the Second World War.

A food and soft drinks distribution depot, with a north-light concreteshell roof, built in the 1950s on the corner of Westferry Road and Cuba Street, remained in use into the 1980s, but by that tFime most of the riverside part of the works had been derelict for some years.

The former Dockside Preserving Factory on the east side of Westferry Road (which remains in industrial use) had been sold. The northern part of the site is now occupied by the Cascades development and the site of the depot by The Anchorage.


Interesting that Moody. My mum's side of the family were fisherfolk from Buckie (Moray Firth, not far from Aberdeen). They fished herring in the North Sea and landed them at Lowestoft or Yarmouth when departing Buckie and vice versa. So it makes complete sense that an Aberdeen based company would establish a herring canning plant at Lowestoft.
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22 October 2017 23:57 Post ID: #1558381 - in reply to #1558244
GeroniMO
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Careful where you are taking this, the FA will have Millwall up on a tin poisoning charge .
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23 October 2017 00:14 Post ID: #1558382 - in reply to #1558381
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bazzwall - 22/10/2017 23:57

Careful where you are taking this, the FA will have Millwall up on a tin poisoning charge .


Very funny! Can you hear the canned laughter....?
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