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Monkey - She's At It Again....!!!
09 November 2017 00:16 Post ID: #1560063
Legend MO
2000200050025
Laura "I" Kuenssberg.

How much does this bloody woman get paid? I presume she's on a special bonus for murdering the English language.

Will you sub it, or me...?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-41922823



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09 November 2017 05:10 Post ID: #1560065 - in reply to #1560063
Supreme MO
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She is a woman at the BBC. Untouchable.
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09 November 2017 07:39 Post ID: #1560066 - in reply to #1560063
MOjo
2000100025
I didn't do very well at school, apart from the last sentence what's wrong with it?
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09 November 2017 08:41 Post ID: #1560069 - in reply to #1560063
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Priti Awful.

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09 November 2017 09:37 Post ID: #1560071 - in reply to #1560066
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FireWall - 9/11/2017 07:39

I didn't do very well at school, apart from the last sentence what's wrong with it?


Just about everything.

It is as if she has just discovered a thing called a comma and just can't stop putting them in whether they mutilate the English language or not.

But the entire construction is awful. Had I handed this in, the News Editor would have just looked at me in disbelief and asked when the real copy was coming. It wouldn't even have made it to the sub's desk.

Wittering on in front of a camera is one thing. But if this woman is going to have her stuff in print, so to speak, on a website then she had better start upping her game. Or the BBC had better find someone in the newsroom with some balls and put a red pen to it....

Oh, half an hour ago checked my overnight emails and an old Fleet Street mate sent it to me as a copy and past job with the note: "even after five pints at lunchtime I was still incapable of churning out bilge like this. Jesus wept!"

Just for a start. Was she really summoned to ask a Minister why he was resigning? Or was she sent?

"Hello, is that the BBC's Political Editor? Oh, good. This is Sir Cedric Fortescew-Smythe here from the Prime Minister's Office and I calling to summon you to No. 10 immediately. We have a senior minister here about to resign and, to compound his and our party's humiliation, you are to ask him why. Have you got that? Yes. Now! And I repeat: it is imperative that you ask him why he has resigned. Goodbye. Oh, and don't dawdle."

or

"McScoop? Editor here. Getting some noises out of Number 10 that Fallon's fucked. We hear his resignation letter is on its way soon. Get over to Number Ten now, where they are expecting you. A film crew is already there. Remember to ask exactly why he's doing this now. Keep us posted."

Which is the more likely?


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09 November 2017 10:00 Post ID: #1560074 - in reply to #1560063
MamMOth
500050005000500050010010025
My favourite quote of hers still has to be: 'silence abhors a vacuum'.
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09 November 2017 10:21 Post ID: #1560075 - in reply to #1560066
GeroniMO
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FireWall - 9/11/2017 07:39

I didn't do very well at school, apart from the last sentence what's wrong with it?


Agreed, the last sentence is awful but the rest is okay. She seems to be one of the journalists who needs two hours to do a piece like that one - and when under pressure, messes it up.
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09 November 2017 10:23 Post ID: #1560076 - in reply to #1560075
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zak attack - 9/11/2017 10:21

FireWall - 9/11/2017 07:39

I didn't do very well at school, apart from the last sentence what's wrong with it?


Agreed, the last sentence is awful but the rest is okay. She seems to be one of the journalists who needs two hours to do a piece like that one - and when under pressure, messes it up.


Zak, trust me: the rest is not okay.
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09 November 2017 10:35 Post ID: #1560078 - in reply to #1560063
MOjo
2000100025
This first sentence seems OK, none of those comma things.
<It was precisely a week ago that I was summoned to the Ministry of Defence to ask Sir Michael Fallon why he was resigning.>

Maybe one extra here?
<Seven days on, for an unconnected reason, Theresa May has just lost another one of her ministers.>

This one??
<That time the resignation was rather differently handled - some private speculation through the day, then a discreet summoning to a quiet room in the department until one of the minister's team came to say: "Be ready, the secretary of state is resigning, we are finalising the letters between us and Number 10 right now.">

5 in this one, I would have made this two or even three sentences with a bit of rearranging.
<This time, the process has been more like a pantomime, with speculation rife for nearly 24 hours that she was on her way out, no-one in government moving to quash it, leaving journalists, on the first day of parliament's recess, free to track Priti Patel's plane online then her journey back to Westminster.>

One extra here?
<Goodness knows what Ms Patel's Ugandan hosts, who were expecting her to visit today, make of it all.>

Can't be bovvered with the rest of it. Am I on the right track??

Beyond today's palaver, though, her exit throws up problems for Mrs May.
It is never as simple as one out, one in.
Mrs May, who hoped to earn her authority back through competence, and orderly government, needs to restore a sense of calm after a chaotic week.
To convey even a limp grip on power, misbehaving ministers need to be brought in line, and a restive Tory party needs to be able to believe Number 10 has some capability left.
But with Ms Patel's departure, the prime minister must try most importantly to preserve the delicate balance around the cabinet table.
Ministers' make up is finely tuned between those who desire a loose arrangement with the European Union after Brexit and those who want to stay tightly bound.
With the balance more or less equal between those factions, it's as if the prime minister has the casting vote.
For as long as that formula is preserved, both sides will preserve her.
Upset that equilibrium with the wrong choices in a reshuffle, even of one, and the way through the most challenging decisions the government faces becomes more complicated, and the prime minister's own position more precarious still.
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09 November 2017 11:01 Post ID: #1560080 - in reply to #1560063
Big MO
10010010010025
I struggle to find any UK based news worth watching/reading anymore. It seems to be, the who is offended today show. Russia Today seems to cover world news better than the BBC, and they have a better grasp of English.
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09 November 2017 11:04 Post ID: #1560082 - in reply to #1560063
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Right. I've tried to tidy up the mess. Compare to the 'orrible original that has been sent out to be read, worldwide, by millions...


It was precisely a week ago we were summoned to the Ministry of Defence and asked Sir Michael Fallon why he was resigning.

Seven days on, for an unconnected reason, Theresa May has just lost another of her ministers.

Last week the resignation was very differently handled - speculation through the day, then a discreet summoning to a quiet room in the department where one of the minister's team briefed us: "be ready, the secretary of state is resigning. We are finalising the letters between us and Number 10 right now."

This time, the process has been more like a pantomime. With speculation rife for nearly 24 hours that Priti Patel was on her way out and no-one in government moving to quash it, journalists on the first day of parliament's recess were free to track the beleaguered Minister's plane online. Then her journey back to Westminster.

Goodness knows what Ms Patel's Ugandan hosts, who were expecting her to visit today, have made of it all.

Beyond today's palaver, though, her exit throws up further problems for Mrs May: it is never as simple as one out, one in.

Mrs May, who had hoped to earn her authority back through competence and orderly government, needs to restore a sense of calm after a chaotic week.

To convey even a limp grip on power, misbehaving ministers have to be brought in line and a restive Tory party needs to be able to believe Number 10 has some capability left.

But, with Ms Patel's departure, the prime minister must now try above all to preserve the delicate balance around the cabinet table. For the make up of ministers is finely tuned between those who desire a loose arrangement with the European Union after Brexit and those who want to stay tightly bound.

With the balance more or less equal between those factions, the prime minister could have the casting vote. And as long as that formula is preserved, both sides will probably want to preserve her.

Upset that equilibrium with the wrong choice of even of one in a Cabinet reshuffle and the way through the most challenging decisions the government faces becomes yet more complicated. And the prime minister's own position more precarious still.

ends


Edited by whiskylion 9/11/2017 11:07
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09 November 2017 11:20 Post ID: #1560083 - in reply to #1560063
MOnster
500050005000500100100100100
haha, this para, I paused so many times I caught the next train.

This time, the process has been more like a pantomime, with speculation rife for nearly 24 hours that she was on her way out, no-one in government moving to quash it, leaving journalists, on the first day of parliament's recess, free to track Priti Patel's plane online then her journey back to Westminster.

I emailed this to her, told her to pant like she was being fucked.

This, time, the, process, has, been, more, like, a, pantomime, with, speculation, rife, for, nearly, 24, hoooooooours, that, she, was, on, her, way, oooout, no-one, in, fuck me, in, fuck me, in, government, moving, to, quash, it, leaving, journalists, on, the, first, day, of, parliament's, recess, free, to, track, Priti, Priti, Priti, please fuck me harder, Patel's, plane, online, then, her, journey, back, to, Westminstahhhhh yes.
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09 November 2017 11:39 Post ID: #1560084 - in reply to #1560074
MOnster
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tony_dolby - 9/11/2017 12:00

My favourite quote of hers still has to be: 'silence abhors a vacuum'.


Perhaps she meant to say a 'vacuum cleaner.' If so, I'd agree. Noisy fuckers.
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09 November 2017 11:44 Post ID: #1560085 - in reply to #1560082
Supreme MO
500020001000500252525
whiskylion - 9/11/2017 11:04

Right. I've tried to tidy up the mess. Compare to the 'orrible original that has been sent out to be read, worldwide, by millions...


It was precisely a week ago we were summoned to the Ministry of Defence and asked Sir Michael Fallon why he was resigning.

Seven days on, for an unconnected reason, Theresa May has just lost another of her ministers.

Last week the resignation was very differently handled - speculation through the day, then a discreet summoning to a quiet room in the department where one of the minister's team briefed us: "be ready, the secretary of state is resigning. We are finalising the letters between us and Number 10 right now."

This time, the process has been more like a pantomime. With speculation rife for nearly 24 hours that Priti Patel was on her way out and no-one in government moving to quash it, journalists on the first day of parliament's recess were free to track the beleaguered Minister's plane online. Then her journey back to Westminster.

Goodness knows what Ms Patel's Ugandan hosts, who were expecting her to visit today, have made of it all.

Beyond today's palaver, though, her exit throws up further problems for Mrs May: it is never as simple as one out, one in.

Mrs May, who had hoped to earn her authority back through competence and orderly government, needs to restore a sense of calm after a chaotic week.

To convey even a limp grip on power, misbehaving ministers have to be brought in line and a restive Tory party needs to be able to believe Number 10 has some capability left.

But, with Ms Patel's departure, the prime minister must now try above all to preserve the delicate balance around the cabinet table. For the make up of ministers is finely tuned between those who desire a loose arrangement with the European Union after Brexit and those who want to stay tightly bound.

With the balance more or less equal between those factions, the prime minister could have the casting vote. And as long as that formula is preserved, both sides will probably want to preserve her.

Upset that equilibrium with the wrong choice of even of one in a Cabinet reshuffle and the way through the most challenging decisions the government faces becomes yet more complicated. And the prime minister's own position more precarious still.

ends


Much more acceptable.

........ now try doing it with a wobbly mouth and a wonky eye.

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09 November 2017 11:58 Post ID: #1560087 - in reply to #1560063
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Seriously mate, I did it over my mid-morning coffee.

Still not the way I would have liked the piece written. For instance, Patel is an arch Leaver, by far one of the party's most strident. That isn't mentioned, or the problems she might cause from the back benches. And where was the drama and intrigue?

Living right out I the sticks, still waiting for my Daily Telegraph to arrive where I'm sure I will read an excellently written take or two on yesterday's machinations. Just have to wait for the delivery man to complete his ten-minute chat to every other person in the village before he gets here....

The written word is far from dead in this country. The Daily and Sunday Telegraph boast an excellent range of writers, able to wring every piece of value out of word or sentence, as does The Spectator and The Times.

And, sometimes, MillwallOnline...



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09 November 2017 12:02 Post ID: #1560089 - in reply to #1560087
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whiskylion - 9/11/2017 11:58

Seriously mate, I did it over my mid-morning coffee.

Still not the way I would have liked the piece written. For instance, Patel is an arch Leaver, by far one of the party's most strident. That isn't mentioned, or the problems she might cause from the back benches. And where was the drama and intrigue?

Living right out I the sticks, still waiting for my Daily Telegraph to arrive where I'm sure I will read an excellently written take or two on yesterday's machinations. Just have to wait for the delivery man to complete his ten-minute chat to every other person in the village before he gets here....

The written word is far from dead in this country. The Daily and Sunday Telegraph boast an excellent range of writers, able to wring every piece of value out of word or sentence, as does The Spectator and The Times.

And, sometimes, MillwallOnline...





I'm more of a Sun kind of bloke.

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09 November 2017 12:16 Post ID: #1560091 - in reply to #1560089
Legend MO
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ParisWall - 9/11/2017 12:02

whiskylion - 9/11/2017 11:58

Seriously mate, I did it over my mid-morning coffee.

Still not the way I would have liked the piece written. For instance, Patel is an arch Leaver, by far one of the party's most strident. That isn't mentioned, or the problems she might cause from the back benches. And where was the drama and intrigue?

Living right out I the sticks, still waiting for my Daily Telegraph to arrive where I'm sure I will read an excellently written take or two on yesterday's machinations. Just have to wait for the delivery man to complete his ten-minute chat to every other person in the village before he gets here....

The written word is far from dead in this country. The Daily and Sunday Telegraph boast an excellent range of writers, able to wring every piece of value out of word or sentence, as does The Spectator and The Times.

And, sometimes, MillwallOnline...





I'm more of a Sun kind of bloke.

:grin:



Oh! Thought your early morning read would be the Burton Mail...!

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